Undergraduate Study: General Information

Introductory Comments

California State University, Los Angeles offers the Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Music, Bachelor of Science degrees.  The specific bachelor’s degrees and academic majors are listed below.  Minors and certificate programs are also available in many fields, and are also listed below. Full descriptions of each of these programs, including specific information about admission requirements, curriculum, courses of instruction, and graduation requirements is presented either in the chapter Academic Programs: Department, Division, and Interdisciplinary-based or in the chapter Academic Programs: College-based and University-wide.  Within each chapter, the administrative units offering the academic programs are listed in alphabetical order.  There is a Directory of Academic Programs at the beginning of the Directories chapter, near the front of this catalog. Characteristics of the different Bachelor’s degrees and the general degree requirements for all Bachelor’s Degrees at Cal State L.A. are described after the listings immediately below.

In addition, the basic information about undergraduate preparation for California teaching credentials is presented later in this chapter. The undergraduate and postbaccalaureate subject matter portions of each of the teaching credential programs are fully described in the appropriate academic department, division or interdisciplinary programs section of that Academic Programs chapter. All of the basic credential programs, the specialist and administrative credential requirements, and the Postbaccalaureate programs of study which prepare students for these credentials are all described in the Charter College of Education portion of the Academic Programs: College-based and University-wide chapter, with further details available within the Divisional portions of the Academic Programs: Department, Division and Interdisciplinary-based chapter.

Students are expected to familiarize themselves with all degree requirements and to consult an academic adviser on a regular basis.

List of Bachelor’s Degrees and Majors

Bachelor of Arts Degrees

African American Studies

Anthropology
Art

Asian and Asian American Studies
Chemistry
Child Development
Chinese
Communication 
Communicative Disorders
Economics
English 
French
Geography
History 
Japanese
Latin-American Studies
Liberal Studies
Mathematics
Mexican-American Studies
Music 
Philosophy 
Physics 
Political Science 
Psychology 
Social Work 
Sociology 
Spanish 
Special Major
Television, Film and Media Studies
Theatre Arts and Dance
Urban Learning

Bachelor of Science Degrees

Aviation Administration

Biochemistry 

Biology 
Business Administration 
Chemistry 
Civil Engineering 
Computer Information Systems
Computer Science

Criminal Justice
Electrical Engineering
Engineering 
Exercise Science 
Fire Protection Administration and Technology 

Food Science and Technology
Geology 
Graphic Communications
Health Science 
Industrial Technology 
Kinesiology
Mathematics
Mechanical Engineering
Microbiology
Natural Science 
Nursing 
Nutritional Science
Physics 
Rehabilitation Services
Special Major

Bachelor of Music Degree

Music

Integrated Bachelor of Science Degree / Master of Science Degree

Computer Science
Mechanical Engineering

List of Minors

That may be taken as part of a Bachelor’s Degree Program

Accounting

Anthropology
Art
Asian Studies
Basic Business
Biology
Central American Studies
Chicano Studies
Child Development
Chinese
Classics
Communication
Comparative Linguistics
Computer Information Systems
Computer Science
Creative Writing
Criminal Justice
Economics
English

Forensic Science
French
Geography
Geology
Global Politics
Health Science
History
Industrial Studies
Information Technology (IT)
Japanese
Labor and Working Class Studies
Law and Society
Latin-American Studies
Management
Mathematics

Mesoamerican Studies
Microbiology
Multimedia
Music
Pan-African Studies
Philosophy (General)
Philosophy (Prelaw) 
Physics
Political Science (General)
Prelegal Studies 
Psychology
Public Administration

Rehabilitation Services
Religious Studies

Science, Technology, and Medicine Studies
Social Gerontology
Sociology
Spanish
Theatre Arts and Dance
Women’s and Gender Studies

List of Credit Certificate Programs

Accounting
Advanced Information Systems
Alcohol and Drug Problems Specialist
Alternative Nutrition
Applied Gerontology
Child Maltreatment and Family Violence
Computer Programming
Entrepreneurship
Fashion Design
Fashion Merchandising
Finance
Fire Protection Risk Analysis and Reduction
Fire Service Administration
General Management
Geographic Information Systems
Human Resources Management
Intercultural Proficiency
International Business
International Business Communication
International Economic Relations
Labor Relations
Law Enforcement Leadership
Marketing
Operations Management
Parent Educator
Retail Professional Development
Sports Nutrition

Transportation (Commercial)
Women, Genders, and Sexualities
Youth Agency Administration

Rules and regulations governing certificate programs and brief descriptions of these programs appear at the end of this chapter.  Specific requirements and course listings appear in the individual academic department, division and school listings following this chapter.

Bachelor’s Degree

Degree Characteristics

The Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree is designed to provide a balanced liberal arts education and general knowledge in a recognized discipline, interdisciplinary field, or areas of professional study.

The Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree is designed to provide a balanced liberal arts education and a scientific, technical, or professional entry level of competence.

The Bachelor of Music (B.M.) degree provides a balanced liberal arts education with additional preparation in musical performance with emphasis on high performance standards.

Degree Requirements

The Bachelor of Arts degree requires the satisfactory completion of 180-186 quarter units.  The Bachelor of Music degree requires 189 quarter units and the Bachelor of Science degree unit requirement varies from 180 to 204 units, as specified individually for each degree program.  Included in the total unit requirement for each of these degrees is a minimum of 72 units of general education courses, including the units necessary to complete mandatory requirements for the U.S. Constitution and American History, 12 units in an upper division theme, and 12 units in residence at Cal State L.A.  For each degree a minimum of 60 quarter units must carry upper division credit (courses numbered 300-499). Courses numbered above 499 are intended for graduate students only and are not applicable toward bachelor's degrees.

Catalog Requirements Under Which an Undergraduate Student Graduates

Unless exception is requested under one of the provisions below, students enrolling at Cal State L.A. for the first time must meet degree requirements specified in the catalog in effect at the time of entrance.  The catalog date is specified on each student’s credit summary.

Baccalaureate students who remain in attendance in regular sessions at any California State University campus, any California community college, or any combination of California community colleges and CSU campuses and thereafter at Cal State L.A. may elect to meet Cal State L.A. graduation requirements in effect at the time they began such attendance, at the time they entered Cal State L.A., or at the time of graduation from Cal State L.A.  In this context, attendance means attendance in at least one semester or two quarters each calendar year, excluding summer session, extension, and concurrent enrollment in Cal State L.A. courses.  Absence due to an approved educational leave or for attendance at another accredited institution of higher learning shall not be considered an interruption in attendance if the interruption does not exceed two years.  Disqualified students retain their existing catalog privileges under the conditions outlined above.

All other transfer students and students who have not remained in attendance as described above will be held to Cal State L.A. graduation requirements in effect at the beginning of their most recent period of attendance at Cal State L.A. or, alternatively, at the time of graduation.  Students who change to a new degree and/or major objective must meet requirements for the new degree and/or major in the catalog in effect at the time of change.  If courses described under earlier requirements are no longer available, the major department or division may authorize or require appropriate substitutes.

General Education is an integral component of the requirements for the bachelor’s degree.  Students who remain in attendance as defined above normally will meet General Education requirements listed in the catalog in effect at time of entrance.  However, they may elect to meet General Education requirements in the catalog in effect either at the time of entrance or graduation, and need not meet major requirements from the same catalog.  If courses described under earlier requirements are no longer available, appropriate substitutes must be selected from the current list of courses approved for the area involved.

Time Limits on Major Requirements for Bachelor’s Degrees

A department, division or school may specify that no subject, unit, or grade credit be granted for specific upper division courses offered by that department, division or school to students who completed such courses more than ten years before the date of their bachelor's degree.  Courses with time limits are designated in the course descriptions in this catalog and on the major program advisement sheets submitted by each student's major department, division or school to the Graduation Office.  When a Cal State L.A. course is so designated, the restriction also applies to equivalent courses transferred from other institutions.  Students may petition for and, in extraordinary circumstances, the major departments, divisions, and schools may grant permission to validate by examination such an expired course with the concurrence of the department, division or school that offers the course or its equivalent. For all requirements, election of any catalog will not extend beyond ten years after its designated academic year.

Residence Requirement

Undergraduate students must complete a minimum of 45 quarter units, including at least 36 upper division units, 18 units in the major, and 12 units in general education courses, in residence at Cal State L.A. for the baccalaureate.  Credit earned in special sessions may be applied toward this residence requirement.  However, only 36 residence units may be earned through Open University.  Credit earned in extension courses or by examination may not apply toward the residence requirement.

Scholarship Requirements

In addition to meeting total unit requirements for graduation, students must also satisfy specific scholarship requirements.  These include achievement of a minimum 2.0 grade point average (C on a scale in which A=4.0) in all units attempted, including those accepted by transfer from another institution, all courses required for the major, all courses used to meet General Education requirements, and all units attempted at Cal State L.A.

Introduction to Higher Education Course Requirement

NOTE: This requirement must be completed no later than the second quarter of attendance at Cal State L.A. All undergraduate students who do not have a bachelor's degree and enter Cal State L.A. Fall 1997 or later, and who are subject to the 1997 and later GE requirements, are required to complete an introduction to higher education course. Freshmen meet this requirement by enrolling in a 100-level course offered by the college that offers the student's major. Undergraduate transfer students who entered Cal State L.A. Fall, 1999 or later and who are subject to the 1997 and later GE requirements are required to complete a Transition to Cal State L.A. course (300 level) offered by the college that offers the student's major. These courses, which must be completed no later than the second quarter of residence at Cal State L.A., introduce students to the following aspects of the University:  History, structure, policies and procedures, faculty expectations, resources and skills necessary for success, and content specific to disciplines in the college that offers the student's major.  Special sections of the courses, organized at the University level, are offered for undeclared students. Students should consult their academic advisers before enrolling in the courses.

Graduation Requirement in Writing Proficiency

All students must demonstrate competency in writing skills as a requirement for graduation. Information on currently available ways to meet this graduation requirement may be obtained from the University Writing Center, located in the Library, Rm. 2097, (323) 343-5350.

Lower Division Writing Requirement

The English Placement Test (EPT), described in the Admissions chapter of this catalog, must be taken before enrolling in any courses at Cal State L.A.  The EPT is prerequisite to all lower division English writing courses.

All baccalaureate students who enter Cal State L.A. Summer 1993 or later, and who are subject to requirements of the 1993-95 or later general education catalog, are required to take two quarters of English composition (ENGL 101 and 102), which must be taken in sequence.  Students entering Cal State L.A. as freshmen must complete these courses before they reach upper division standing (90 quarter units).  Transfer students entering above the freshmen level who are required to take one or both of these composition courses must do so before they complete 45 quarter units at Cal State L.A.  Only the first of the two courses (ENGL 101) is applied to General Education.  The second course (ENGL 102) is prerequisite to UNIV 400 (WPE).

Upper Division Writing Requirements
WPE/GWAR

All Cal State L.A. students who entered Summer 1984 or later and are pursuing a degree or credential must satisfy the Graduation Writing Assessment Requirement (GWAR) by passing the Writing Proficiency Examination (WPE).  Students must first pass ENGL 101 and 102 (or their equivalents) with a minimum grade of C prior to taking the WPE.  The WPE must be taken and passed prior to completion of the 135 quarter units.  Transfer students who have completed 135 units upon entrance must pass the WPE during their first quarter of residence at Cal State L.A.  Students who have satisfied the upper division writing proficiency requirement at another CSU campus shall be considered to have met the Cal State L.A. requirement.

Students who fail to take and pass the WPE within the required time limit of 135 units will have a hold placed on their records, which will preclude them from enrolling in any courses until the WPE requirement is satisfied.  Students who receive a No Credit (NC) grade on the WPE must meet with a WPE consultant in the University Writing Center to discuss deficiencies identified by the exam and receive recommendations of activities to correct these deficiencies.  Based on the recommendations from the WPE consultant, students may re-take the WPE or enroll in UNIV 401, the upper division writing proficiency course.

To take the WPE, students must register for UNIV 400 by the add deadline of each quarter.  Additional information about the WPE is available in the Schedule of Classes and at the University Writing Center.

The postbaccalaureate writing skills requirement–for students pursuing graduate degrees and credentials–is described in the Graduate and Postbaccalaureate Study: General Information chapter.

Summary of Bachelor’s Degree Requirements

Total units required for degrees:

Bachelor of Arts (B.A.)

180 -186  units

Bachelor of Music (B.M.)

189 units

Bachelor of Science (B.S.)

180–204 units  (depending on major)

Writing skills requirements (for all Bachelor’s Degrees): 

· a minimum grade of “C” in ENGL 101 and 102, and a

· a passing score on the Writing Proficiency   Examination (WPE) OR a minimum  grade of “C” in UNIV 401, and

· a minimum grade of “C” in an upper division writing course designated by the major.

Grade point average:  *

Minimum C (2.0) average in:

· all college work attempted

· all courses attempted at Cal State L.A.

· all general education courses

· all courses required for major**

* Students receive no credit for any course in which they do not earn a passing grade -- i.e., D- or higher.

** Some majors require a minimum C grade in each course that is used to fulfill major requirements.

Required Distribution of Units (for all Bachelor’s Degrees):

General education:

         72 units, including:
                   12 in residence
·                   12 in an upper division theme

Major subject area:
          Varies depending on major

Upper division units
          60 units minimum

In residence
          45 units at Cal State L.A. including:
·                    36 upper division units
·                    18 units in a major
·                   12 units in general education

Introduction to Higher Education course
            One course   

One course (ENGL 102) in written communication
beyond the General Education Requirement
4 units

Other Bachelor Degree Regulations

Preliminary Evaluation of College Work Completed Elsewhere

College work completed elsewhere is evaluated in terms of its relevance to Cal State L.A. course offerings and degree requirements.  Preliminary evaluation information is sent to all new transfer and readmitted students at the time of notification of eligibility for admission to the University.  A complete evaluation of transfer work is mailed to all new transfer and readmitted students during their first quarter of attendance.  The evaluation identifies general education and graduation requirements met by transfer courses and transfer unit credit accepted.  For readmitted students, it also identifies general education and graduation requirements met by Cal State L.A. courses.  Students should review their evaluation carefully, consult their academic department promptly if they do not agree with or fully understand all information on the evaluation, and keep it in a safe place for easy reference.  Determination of the catalog governing graduation requirements is explained below.

Special Major for the Bachelor’s Degree

The Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degree with a Special Major allows selected students an opportunity to pursue individualized programs of study if their academic and professional goals cannot be met through existing degree programs, or combinations of programs (i.e., majors, minors, etc.), at Cal State L.A. or other CSU campuses. The Special Major consists of a program of study in two or more disciplines developed in consultation with faculty members from the respective departments.  See the University Programs section of the Academic Programs: College-based and University-wide chapter for details about these degree programs.

Multiple Majors and/or Degrees

Students may earn the same or different baccalaureate degree(s), e.g. a B.A. with multiple majors, or B.A. and  B.S. degrees, if the requirements for each of the multiple majors leading to the degree(s) are completed in the same quarter.  Students may also earn a baccalaureate and graduate degree, e.g. B.A. and M.S. degrees, or B.S. and M.A. degrees, if the requirements for each of the multiple degrees are completed in the same quarter.

Students who wish to have multiple majors and/or degrees listed on their diploma and transcript must: 

Fulfill department/division/school requirements in the multiple majors and/or degrees;
File a request endorsed by the multiple departments,  divisions, and/or schools; and
Be approved and recommended for graduation by the  faculty of each major department,
division or school granting the majors and/or degree(s)

Second Baccalaureate

Students seeking a second baccalaureate from Cal State L.A. may qualify for graduation with the approval and recommendation of the faculty upon completion of the following:

1. Residence and scholarship requirements then in effect;

2. A major program as specified by the major department;

3. Completion of a minimum of 45 quarter units in residence beyond the requirements of the first degree.  The 45 quarter units in residence must include at least 36 units in upper division courses, at least 18 units in the second academic major and 12 units in general education if applicable;

4. General education requirements as appropriate;

A) A student completing a baccalaureate program at Cal State L.A. who remains in continuous attendance will not be required to complete additional G.E. requirements for the second baccalaureate degree.

B) A student who has completed a baccalaureate program at Cal State L.A. who returns to complete a second baccalaureate degree will be required to complete 12 units of upper division G.E. units if this requirement was not satisfied with the first degree. A student must complete two G.E. courses designated as “diversity” courses that can be counted as part of the 12 units of upper division G.E. requirements.

C) A student who completes a baccalaureate degree from another accredited institution will be required to complete the following G.E. requirements if they were not completed as part of the first degree:

i. Breadth requirements of Executive Order 595, i.e. 16 units in each of the three areas ( including   4 upper division units in each) of natural sciences and mathematics, humanities, and social sciences.  Course by course articulation or comparability will not be required.  Sub-blocks (B1, B2, B3) will not be considered, i.e., the G.E. block as a whole will be evaluated. 

ii. Statutory requirements, i.e., U.S. History and California state and local government.

iii. Diversity requirement, i.e., completing two G.E. courses designated as “diversity” courses.

5.     Any University requirements not previously satisfied (e.g., ENGL 102, WPE).

Units included in a second baccalaureate program may not be applied to a graduate degree.  Candidates for second baccalaureates are eligible for the Dean’s List and other academic honors based on the same criteria as candidates for first degrees.  A second baccalaureate candidate may graduate with honors according to the same criteria as candidates for first degrees, with the grade point average computed on all units attempted in residence at Cal State L.A.

Minors

Although a minor is not required for a baccalaureate, minors are available in many fields for the purpose of strengthening students  preparation in areas related to the major field or to career choices.  A minor may not be taken in the same subject as the major.

A minor consists of a formal aggregate of courses totaling 18 or more quarter units, of which at least 12 units must be upper division and taken in residence at Cal State L.A.  A minimum C (2.0) grade point average is required on all course work taken to complete the minor program.  The minor will be noted on the student’s transcript if the individual program has been approved by the offering department, division or school and is completed at the same time as the work for the degree itself.  Requirements for the minor must be completed either before or simultaneously with requirements for the degree.  Minors will not be granted if any requirement of the minor is completed after requirements for the degree.  Interested students should consult an adviser in the department, division or school offering the minor of their choice.  A list of the approved minors appears at the beginning of this chapter.

Undergraduate Credit for Graduate Courses

*Under special academic circumstances as specified below, an academic program, department, division or school, may approve the granting of baccalaureate credit for 500-level course work to a maximum of two courses not to exceed a total of 9 quarter units.  Academic credits earned under this rule may not be used to satisfy requirements towards M.A. and M.S. degrees awarded by California State University, Los Angeles.  Additionally, the following conditions must be met:  

·     Senior standing at the time of petition (completion of 135 quarter units);

·     a grade point average adequate for admission in classified standing to the master's program in that major;

·     permission of the instructor teaching the course, the student's advisor, and the chair or director of the
     department, division or school offering the course

*(Senate: 11/15/69, 7/10/79, 4/17/07; President: 12/31/69, 7/31/79, 5/11/07; Editorial Amendment: 8/01)

Graduate Credit for Undergraduate Students

*Undergraduate students with 135 quarter units completed may take for graduate credit a maximum of 13 quarter units in courses beyond the minimum requirements for the baccalaureate degree, provided they have maintained a grade point average of 2.75.  Graduate credit is allowed for courses numbered in the 400 and 500 series only.  Enrollment in any course for which graduate credit is requested must be approved in advance by the instructor teaching the course, the student's adviser and the coordinator/chair/director of the program/department/division/school offering the course.

The approved application must be delivered to the Graduation Office, Administration 409, during the quarter before that in which courses are to be taken. 

*(Senate: 11/15/69, 7/10/79, 7/10/07; President: 12/31/69, 7/31/79, 10/30/07)

Application for Graduation (Degree Check)

Once a minimum of 135-quarter units is earned, students may apply for graduation. Application for graduation (degree check) is made on a form available at the Cal State L.A. Graduation Office Website, academic department / division / school, the college advisement centers and at Enrollment Services in Administration 146. These forms are available five days prior to the application filing period. Candidates take their completed application form for payment to the Cashiers Office. Once payment is made, candidates take their application to their department, division  or school for approval and processing. Filing periods are published in the Graduation Information section of the Schedule of Classes.

Students arrange to meet with their faculty adviser who will complete the Bachelors Degree Worksheet and approve the candidate's major program. The department, division or school will forward all documentation to the Graduation office for processing. The Graduation Office notifies students of the receipt of their graduation application and supporting documents.

Graduation check results are sent to the students in the mail prior to their final anticipated quarter. Students who are enrolled in the quarter they expect to graduate but do not complete all degree requirements will have their graduation application "automatically" transferred to the following quarter for processing. All questions regarding the graduation check or final results are to be directed to the student's major department, division or school.

Degrees dates are posted at the end of the quarter in which all requirements are met.

Commencement Exercises

Commencement is held annually at the end of the Spring Quarter.  Students who have completed degree requirements in Fall and those applying for graduation Winter, Spring and Summer Quarters are eligible to participate in the ceremony.  Information bulletins about commencement activities are mailed to the home address of those eligible to participate early in the spring, and are available on campus at college, department, division, and school offices and Administration 146 and 409.

During Commencement Exercises, degrees are conferred on the candidates by the President of the University.  Although each candidate receives a diploma cover during the program, the actual diploma is sent several months later.  A few weeks after graduation, eligible candidates receive a letter of congratulations in the mail and degrees are posted on their permanent academic records.

Credit for Prior Experiential Learning (CPEL)

Through the CPEL program, Cal State L.A. grants up to 12 units of undergraduate academic credit for prior learning, knowledge, or skills-based experience that has been documented and evaluated according to campus policy.  Students should be aware, however, that policies for earning credit for prior learning vary among CSU campuses.  See the University-wide programs section of the Academic Programs: College-based and University-wide chapter for more details about this program.

Cooperative Education

Cal State L.A. offers a range of Cooperative Education courses carrying different unit values.  The Cooperative Education program provides educational enhancement by integrating classroom studies with related on-the-job experiences.  With department, division or school approval, students may earn a maximum of 12 quarter units of elective credit toward an academic major or minor, including a maximum of 9 transferred quarter units.  A maximum of 16 quarter units earned in cooperative education may apply toward a baccalaureate.  With department, division or school approval, from 1 to 4 units of credit can be earned per quarter, based upon a minimum 10 hours per week of approved work experience for each unit of credit.  Cooperative education may be offered in any department, division or school.  For details see the University-wide section of the Academic Programs: College-based and University-wide chapter.

Internship in Public Service

The Internship in Public Service program combines individual instruction with practical experience in government agencies and quasi-public enterprises.  Although enrollment usually is restricted to Political Science majors, non-majors with appropriate background and preparation may apply.  The program operates similarly to the Cooperative Education program, except that the maximum 6 units earned may apply only to upper division free elective credit rather than toward the major.  A qualifying civil service examination is required for admission to some internship programs.  Information about opportunities and qualifications may be obtained from the coordinator in the Political Science Department.

The General Education Program

Introduction

The California State University (CSU) requires that each baccalaureate graduate have completed a program of general education breadth requirements in addition to a major program of study.  The general education program is designed to ensure that graduates “have made noteworthy progress toward becoming truly educated persons.” Although the general areas of study and minimum unit requirements within them are prescribed by the CSU Board of Trustees, the individual campuses are given the authority to set course requirements within those areas, to add other requirements, and to enact other regulations.  California State University, Los Angeles has designed its general education program within these guidelines.

Each baccalaureate student who entered Cal State L.A. Fall 1998 or later and who is subject to requirements in the 1998–1999 or any later catalog shall complete the general education program described below.  Students who entered Cal State L.A. in Summer 1987 or after must complete the program with a minimum C (2.0) average and a minimum C grade in all basic subjects courses.

It is essential that students plan their general education programs with the help of an academic adviser.  Please consult the current Schedule of Classes for specific information about distribution requirements, unit requirements, and current general education courses.  General requirements include a minimum of 72 quarter units to be selected in accordance with the specified distributions among the designated categories.  At least 12 units of upper division course work must be included and selected from the list of approved upper division theme courses. Courses used to meet upper division general education requirements may not be used to meet requirements for a major. All students must complete a minimum of 12 quarter units of general education courses in residence at Cal State L.A. 

Departments, divisions, and schools that require of their majors specific courses that are certified by the offering department, division or school as at least equivalent to the general education courses in a given subject may permit approved G.E. replacements courses.  Students should consult a department/division/school adviser or college-based advisement centers for the approved list of G.E. replacement courses.

Certification of General Education 

Under the provisions that govern general education within the CSU, regionally accredited, participating colleges and universities may certify the completion of a portion of the 48 semester (72 quarter) units required in general education.  Cal State L.A. will accept up to 39 semester (60 quarter) units of course work certified by another authorized institution.  However, such acceptance is limited to the number of units required in each area and to a maximum of 30 semester (45 quarter) units in Areas B through D.  Course work completed by students whose general education requirements are not certified by the transfer institution is evaluated in terms of Cal State L.A.’s current general education requirements.

Students are cautioned that certification is not automatic; each student must request it.  In addition, all participating colleges and universities have their own policies governing certification.  Students are strongly advised to read their college or university catalog carefully and to consult a counselor for details about individual regulations and restrictions.

Students who transfer to Cal State L.A. who were certified as having completed the lower division general education requirements under previous requirements but who have not maintained continuous attendance must complete Cal State L.A.’s upper division general education requirements. 

Philosophy and Goals of the General Education Program

The General Education program enriches the lives of students as they acquire knowledge, learn to think critically, and use methodologies of the various disciplines. Students also learn to prepare for participation in a democracy, to appreciate a sense of shared cultural heritage, and to understand the environment. Students experience self-discovery and personal growth and recognize them as lifelong processes.

General Education Mission Statement

General education is a critical component of students  academic and personal development. The General Education program endeavors to develop the following three separate, but related and equally important, qualities in our students:

1. A knowledge and understanding of themselves, their social and natural environment and a wide range of cultural achievements.

General education courses provide students with an opportunity to acquire knowledge about their own bodies and minds and about humankind’s common heritage and cultural achievements. The General Education program also enables students to develop global perspectives; to develop common commitments and mutual respect among diverse social, cultural and ethnic groups; to establish an understanding of the biological and physical aspects of the world and the universe; and to nurture an understanding of environmental responsibilities.

2. A firm command of communication and analytical skills.

The General Education program develops the ability of students to think clearly and logically, to find and examine information, to communicate effectively in oral and written form, and to perform quantitative analysis. The General Education program also cultivates the students  ability to reason critically, to solve problems creatively and to understand the major methods of intellectual inquiry.

3. A moral commitment to their fellow human beings and an awareness of ethical and social concerns.

The General Education program emphasizes the interdependence of individuals with the human community and the natural world by focusing on the knowledge, experiences, relationships, and ethical concerns common to all people.  In affirming the community’s claim on its individual members, general education courses explore shared and diverse cultural heritages and an agenda of common and pressing contemporary problems, cultivate mutual responsibilities to the commonwealth, and stimulate commitments to moral values and ethical behavior. Consistent with the mission of the University, the purposes of general education are to provide a knowledge and understanding of common problems, experiences and traditions that will enhance students  participation in a culturally diverse global society, and to provide an assessment of finite resources, mutual human needs and values.

The Goals of the General Education Program

General education at Cal State L.A. is devoted to a number of basic goals, which include:

1. Developing awareness of the sense of community and global interdependence of human experience and of the concomitant ethical responsibilities to fellow human beings.

The General Education program is designed to help students achieve a sense of the essential relationship of self to the community and environment with emphasis on their responsibilities to human society. Group and individualized experiences that encourage ethical behavior should be a part of the general education program.

2.  Fostering intellectual curiosity and an appreciation of the major discoveries and achievements in the arts, letters, natural and social sciences, technology, and other major academic disciplines.

The General Education program is designed to stimulate curiosity for knowledge and excitement for lifelong learning. The nature of the courses and experiences in the program are planned to encourage students  interest in diverse aspects of education. The faculty is committed to offering students unique classroom opportunities and to challenging them to continue to study and learn long after course requirements are met. The General Education program includes an historical awareness of the major developments in the human experience as well as a contemporary awareness of the applications of new technologies which will play an increasingly important role in life.

3. Achieving competence in basic skills.

The General Education program is designed to ensure that students master basic communication, critical thinking and quantitative skills so that they may achieve academic excellence. In meeting this goal, the General Education program pays special attention to the multicultural nature of the Cal State L.A. campus community and to the needs of students who are limited in English language proficiency.  Language development instruction is an integral part of general education at Cal State L.A. The General Education program at Cal State L.A. places an emphasis on developing competence in the English language through its curriculum.

4. Recognizing and appreciating the multicultural nature of human existence in general and of American society in particular.

The General Education program is designed to encourage students to develop appreciation for the multicultural dimensions of life in California, the nation, and the world.

Uniquely on this campus, faculty draw upon the special expertise and the abundance of multicultural experiences of the student population in cultivating this cultural awareness. The General Education program offers students the opportunity to recognize the rich heritage and socially diverse environment of California and of the nation.  The program also enables students to become aware of universal experiences that are part of all cultures as well as the varieties of value systems that are in operation in today’s global society.

5. Developing an appreciation of a shared and diverse cultural heritage and cultivating an awareness of contemporary world and its problems.

The General Education program provides for its diverse student body a familiarity with and a critical appraisal of American culture and its historical roots and antecedents. Students assess critically the impact and influence of American tradition, which includes the political, economic, social and communication systems, as well as the artistic and literary heritage, on the contemporary world.

The Structure of the General Education Program

The general education breadth requirements are structured so that introductory courses are taken prior to participation in integrative experiences.  Students are expected to complete the general education requirements in written and oral communication, critical thinking, and mathematics, and general education prerequisite courses before enrolling in any upper division general education theme course.  All courses approved for general education credit, including those lower division courses that also earn credit toward a major, are mandated to require the practice of writing in English including, where appropriate, library assignments.  Evaluation of writing is included in all courses.

All baccalaureate students who enter Cal State L.A. Fall Quarter 1998 or later and who are subject to 1998-99 or later requirements shall complete the General Education program described below, in consultation with a faculty adviser.  The requirements include a minimum of 60 lower division units and 12 upper division units, selected from approved themes, for a total of 72 units.  In addition, at least 12 of the total 72 units must be earned at Cal State L.A. Students must complete two diversity courses which may be completed at either the lower or upper division level of the General Education program. Students are urged to consult an academic adviser in their major department/division or college-based advisement center in selecting general education courses.  All students who are subject to the requirements of the 1987-89 or later catalog must earn a C average in their General Education program and minimum C grades (2.0 G.P.A.) in all Block A (basic subjects) courses.  A grade of “C-” is not acceptable.   All basic subjects must be completed within the first 45 units counted toward the baccalaureate degree.

Configuration Of “Blocks” Of G. E. Courses

A.     BASIC SUBJECTS  (16 units)  One course from each area.

     1.  Written Communication* (4 units)     3.  Critical Thinking (4 units)

     2.  Oral Communication (4 units)          4.  Mathematical Concepts and Quantitative Reasoning (4 units)

A minimum C grade in all basic subjects courses is required of all students.

     AMERICAN INSTITUTIONS  (Minimum of 8 units)

     U.S. History     U.S. Constitution     State/Local Government

All three areas must be met: POLS 150 meets both U.S. Constitution and State/Local Government.

B.     NATURAL SCIENCES:  8 or 12 units from 2 or 3 different areas, based on the classification of the student's major as listed below. A Biological and a Physical Science course with lab are required of all students. The third required course is an applied Natural Science course.

     1.  Biological Science with lab (4 units)     3.  Applied Natural Science course (4 units)

     2.  Physical Science with lab (4 units)

C.     HUMANITIES 8 or 12 units from 2 or 3 different areas, based on the classification of the student’s major as listed below. Students must take either 8 units from 2 different areas or 12 units from 3 different areas. An integrated Humanities course may count as one of the area requirements.

     1.  Literature and Drama     3.  Philosophy and Religious Studies     5.  Integrated Humanities course

     2.  Arts                    4.  Languages Other than English

D.     SOCIAL SCIENCES:   8 or 12 units from 2 or 3 different disciplines, based on the classification of the student’s major as listed below.  Students must take either 8 units from 2 different disciplines or 12 units from 3 different disciplines. An integrated Social Science course may count as one of the required courses.

E.     LIFELONG UNDERSTANDING AND SELF-DEVELOPMENT (4 units)

F.     UPPER DIVISION THEME  (12 units

Students must complete one course in each of the three discipline areas (Natural Sciences and Mathematics, Social Sciences, and Humanities) as required in a theme.  Completion of basic subjects requirements (Block A) and at least one course each from blocks B, C, and D are prerequisites to all upper division theme courses.

G.     DIVERSITY REQUIREMENT (2 courses)

Students must complete two courses certified as diversity courses. These courses may be completed at either the lower division or upper division level from among courses satisfying general education requirements in blocks C, D, E, and F.  Diversity courses are designated with a (d) by each course.  Diversity courses are required for students who are subject to Fall 1998 or later GE requirements.

*All students who entered Cal State L.A. Summer 1993 or later and who are subject to requirements in the 1993-95 or any later catalog are required to have two courses (ENGL 101 and 102 - 8 units) in Written Communication;  however, only the first of  the two courses (ENGL 101  - 4 units) is  applied  to General  Education. Both courses must be completed with a C or higher grade.

Summary of the Configuration of General Education Units

Configuration of Units

A

B

C

D

E

 

F

 

Basic
Subjects

American
Institutions

Natural
Sciences

Humanities

Social
Sciences

Lifelong
Understanding& Self-Devel

Lower
Division
Total

Upper
Division
Themes

General
Education
Total

16

8

8 or 12

8 or 12

8 or 12

4

60

12

72

General Education Lower Division Courses

Effective Fall Quarter 1998

*Information Provided Below Will Assist You in Determining the GE Unit Requirements for Blocks B, C and D based on Your Major.

A
Basic
Subjects


American
Institutions

B
Natural
Sciences

C

Humanities

D
Social
Sciences

E
Lifelong Understanding
and Self-Development

UNITS: 16

8

8 or 12

8 or 12

8 or 12

4

* A1 WRITTEN COMM
ENGL 101

* A2 ORAL COMM
COMM 150

* A3 CRITICAL THINKING
COMM 176

PHIL 160, 250
POLS 155

A4 MATHMATICAL
CONCEPTS AND
QUANTITATIVE
REASONING

ECON/ MATH109
* MATH 100, 102

* minimum C grade in these classes is required. A 'C-' grade is not acceptable.

US HISTORY

HIST 202A or  202B

U.S. CONSTITUTION

+POLS 150

STATE/LOCAL GOV'T

+POLS 150 or 200

+POLS 150 meets both areas

B1 BIOLOGICAL
(with lab)

BIOL 155, 156
MICR 151

B2 PHYSICAL
(with lab)

ASTR 151 with 152
CHEM 158 with 159
GEOG 170
GEOL 150, 155
PHYS 156

B3 APPLIED NATURAL

ANTH 260
ASTR 160
BIOL 158
BIOL 165
CE 220
GEOG 160
GEOL 158

C1 LITERATURE AND
DRAMA

    ANTH/ENGL 245
(d)CHS 201
    ENGL 207, 250
    258,
(d)260, (d)270, 280
    SPAN 242
    TA 152

C2 ARTS

    ART 101ABC, 150
    152, 155
    156, 157, 159, (d)209 
    CHS 112
(d)CHS/PAS 260
    DANC 157
    DANC/TA/TVF210
    ENGL/TVF225
(d)LBS 234
    MUS 150, 151,
    152, 156, 157, 160

C3 PHILOSOPHY AND
RELIGIOUS STUDIES

     PHIL 151, 152
(d) PHIL/RELS 200
(d) PHIL 220

C4 LANGUAGES OTHER
THAN ENGLISH

COMD 150
CHIN 100ABC, 101ABC,
200ABC
FREN 100ABC, 130, 200AB
GERM 100ABC
ITAL 100ABC, 200ABC
JAPN 100ABC, 130,
200ABC,
KOR 100ABC
LATN 100ABC,
PAS 120
PORT 100ABC
RUSS 101AB
SPAN 100ABC, 105, 130,
200ABC, 205ABC

C-5 INTEGRATED
HUMANITIES

ENGL/TA / TVF240 ENGL/PHIL 210

(d) Approved diversity
courses

(d) AAAS 200
(d) ANTH 250

     ANTH/ENGL 230
(d) BUS 250
     CHDV 140
(d) CHS 111 or
(d) CHS/LAS 255
(d) CRIM 210
     ECON 150
(d) GEOG 155
     HIST 110ABC
(d) HIST 150 or
(d) SOC 263
(d) LAS/PAS 102

(d) PAS 180
     PAS 250AB
     POLS 250
     PSY 150
     SOC 201

(d) TVF 250
     URBA 180
(d) WOMN 203

INTEGRATED
SOCIAL SCIENCES

(d)LAS 150

(d) Approved diversity
courses

     ANTH 265
(d) ART 240
     BUS 200
(d) CHDV/SOC 120
     COMM 230
     HS 150
     KIN 150
(d) PHIL 230
     POLS 120
     PSY 160
(d) SOC 202
     TECH 250

NOTE:
AL 101, BUS 101,
EDUC 101, HHS 101,
NSS 101, UNIV 101
Satisfy both IHE and
Block E requirements.

(d) Courses with the
course number
preceded by the
designation (d)
indicate those
approved to meet the
2-course
Block G -
Diversity
requirement.

(See previous page for definitions of G.E.
"Blocks.")

NOTES:

· A minimum C grade average in general education is required.

· Other courses may be substituted  in some categories in conjunction with a student's major. Consult a department or division adviser for a list of approved GE replacement courses.

· Students must complete two diversity courses which may be selected from blocks C, D, E or from GE upper division themes.

· ENGL 102 is reqruied of all students who entered Cal State L.A. Summer 1993 or later, and who are subject to the requirements of the 1993-95 or later GE catalog. A minimum C grade is required. A 'C-' grade is not acceptable.

G.E. Classification Of Majors

The Information Provided Below Will Assist You in Determining the Number of Units You Must Take, Based on Your Major in Natural Sciences (Block B), Humanities (Block C) and Social Sciences (Block D).  GE Courses are Listed in the General Education Lower Division Course Table on the Opposing Page

Natural Science-based Majors*-8 Units in Block B, 12 Units in Block C and 12 Units in Block D

Students majoring in the following programs must take 8 units of natural sciences (biological and physical, each with lab-B1 and B2), 12 units of humanities (integrated humanities course may count as one of the areas), and 12 units of social sciences (integrated social science course may count as one of the areas). Students majoring in biological science-based fields must take one physical science general education course and one other natural science G.E. course. Students majoring in physical science-based fields must take one biological science-based general education course and one other natural science G.E. course.

Biochemistry (B.S.)

Food Science and Technology

Natural Science (B.S.)

Biology (B.S.)

Geology (B.S.)

Nursing (B.S.)

Chemistry (B.A., B.S.)

Health Science (B.S.)

Nutritional Science (B.S.)

Computer Science (B.S.)

Kinesiology (B.S.)

Physics (B.A., B.S.)

Engineering (B.S.)**

Mathematics (B.A., B.S.)

 

Exercise Science (B.S.)

Microbiology (B.S.)

 
Humanities-based Majors-12 Units in Block B, 8 Units in Block C and 12 Units in Block D

Students majoring in the following programs must take 12 units of natural science (4 units in each of the areas-biological B1, physical B2, and applied natural B3), 8 units of humanities, and 12 units of social sciences. Students majoring in humanities-based fields must take two humanities courses, one of which may be an integrated humanities course.

Art (B.A.)

Industrial Arts (B.A.)

Philosophy (B.A.)

Chinese (B.A.)

Japanese (B.A.)

Spanish (B.A.)

Communication (B.A.)

Liberal Studies (B.A.)

Television, Film & Media Studies (B.A.)

English (B.A.)

Music (BMus, B.A.)

Theatre Arts and Dance (B.A.)

French (B.A.)

  
Social Science-based Majors - 12 Units in Block B, 12 Units in Block C and 8 Units in Block D

Students majoring in the following programs must take 12 units of natural science (4 units in each of the areas-biological B1, physical B2, and applied natural B3), 12 units of humanities (integrated humanities course may count as one of the areas), and 8 units of social sciences. Students majoring in social science-based fields must take two social science general education courses, one of which may be an integrated social science course.

African American Studies (B.A.)

Economics (B.A.)

Psychology (B.A.)

Anthropology (B.A.)

Fire Protection Administration and Technology (B.S.)

Rehabilitation Services (B.S.)

Asian and Asian American Studies (B.A.)

Geography (B.A.)

Social Work (B.A.)

Aviation Administration (B.S.)

Graphic Communications (B.S.)

Sociology (B.A.)

Business Administration (B.S.)

History (B.A.)

Urban Learning (B.A.)

Child Development (B.A.)

Industrial Technology (B.S.)

 

Communicative Disorders (B.A.)

Latin American Studies (B.A.)

 

Computer Information Systems (B.S.)

Mexican-American Studies (B.A.)

 

Criminal Justice (B.S.)

Political Science ( B.A.)

 

* Students should choose general  education  courses  in  consultation  with  an  academic  adviser  in  their  major  department  or division. This is particularly important for science majors whose General Education natural science  requirements  will  differ  from  the courses  listed  in  the general  education  program.

** GE  program for Engineering majors is available in the College of Engineering, Computer Science, and Technology. See a faculty  adviser for details.

G.E. Upper Division Themes (Block F)

Students are required to complete a 12-unit upper division theme as part of the General Education program.  A theme consists of three interrelated courses on the same topic, designed to help students acquire knowledge of topics that are current, enduring, and of significant importance for humanity. Topics are designed to promote: an understanding of oneself and one’s fellow human beings, the social and physical environment, and a wide range of cultural achievements; an understanding of the shared concerns of all people as well as diverse cultural heritages; and an awareness of ethical and social concerns and a cultivation of moral responsibility.

Courses in each theme are distributed among three areas including: Natural Sciences and Mathematics, Social Sciences and Humanities. Students are thereby provided with the perspectives of at least three different disciplines on the theme’s topic and must select one course from each area for the theme selected. Completion of the lower division basic subjects requirement is prerequisite to all upper division theme courses, as well as completion of any additional lower division general education course that may be required as a prerequisite. Courses used to meet upper division general education requirements may not be used for a major.

Additionally, students must choose theme courses outside of their major department/division/school unless a departmental/divisional/school waiver has been approved by the General Education Subcommittee.

Students may meet the general education diversity requirement (2 courses) by completing courses designated as diversity courses at the lower or upper division level from among courses satisfying general education requirements.  All courses approved to meet the diversity requirement are designated as (d) by each course.

Students who have completed the upper division theme are deemed to be “G.E. satisfied” at the upper division level.  Students will not be held to further upper division G.E. course requirements upon a change of major.

Students may choose from the following themes, in consultation with an adviser.

NOTE: Courses with the course number preceded by the designation (d) indicate those approved to meet the 2-course

     Block G – Diversity requirement.

A.     Challenge of Change in the Developing World

This theme explores the dilemmas faced by the peoples of Africa, Asia, the Middle East and Latin America as they struggle to overcome legacies of colonialism and economic dependence.  The developing countries are characterized by severe social and cultural tensions, physical complexities and challenges to themselves and the rest of the world.  Their current integration into the global economy marks a crucial stage in world history.  The natural science courses assess their physical settings, constraints and possibilities; the social science courses analyze social, political and economic processes of change; the humanities component examines the dynamic interplay among the arts, religion and cultural values.

Natural Sciences and Mathematics
 

GEOG/GEOL 312

Global Climate Change and the Developing World (4)

 

GEOG 333

Environment and Development in the Third World (4)

 

GEOL 351

Environmental Geology of  Developing Nations (4)

 

HS      356

Issues in Global Health (4)

Social Sciences
 

COMM/LBS 395

Sociocultural Impact of Globalization For the Developing World (4)

 

ECON 360

Developing Countries and the New Global Economy (4)

 

HIST 360 

Revolution and Society in Developing Countries (4)

 

(d)LAS/PAS/POLS 360

Dynamics of Change in the Developing World (4)

Humanities

(d)LAS/PAS  342

Cultural Impact of Development (4)

    (d) MUS 358

Music of the Oppressed in Latin America (4)

 

PHIL 334

Post-Colonial Values and Modernization in the Developing World (4)

 

TVF 324

Third Cinema/Video (4)

B.     Perspectives On Violence

The Perspectives on Violence theme utilizes a multidisciplinary approach that provides comprehensive investigations, discussions, and the debate about theories, research and conflict/violence reduction strategies relevant to the causes and effects of violent behavior.  The theme is structured to increase students  understanding of the nature, causes and complexities of violence in its myriad forms, including the study of how, when, and why it occurs as well as what can be done to reduce it.

Natural Sciences and Mathematics
 

ANTH 315

Evolutionary Perspectives on  Violence (4)

 

HS/NURS 308

Psychophysiology of Substance Abuse and Violence (4)

 

NURS/PSY 307

Physiology and Psychology of Violence and Aggression (4)

Social Sciences
 

COMD/PSY 309

Human Violence and Individual  Change (4)

 

HIST/POLS 351

Beyond Conflict, Violence and War (4)

 

NURS/SW 355

Strategies for Preventing and Intervening in Family Violence and Abuse (4)

 

SOC 383

Violence in American Society (4)

Humanities
 

ENGL 382

Violence and Literature (4)

 

PHIL 325

Violence and Ethics (4)

 

TA 314

Staging Violence in World Theatre (4)

 

TVF 366

Violence and the Media (4)

C.     Gender in the Diversity of Human Experience

This theme provides an integrated inquiry into the implication of gender, exploring its meaning, significance, and status within the diversity of human experience and representations of sex and gender specific to the multitude of cultures and societies making up the human experience, both historically and today.

Natural Sciences and Mathematics
 

ANTH 310

Evolutionary Perspectives on Gender (4)

 

BIOL 388N/PSY 388

Sex and Gender (4)

 

LBS      386

Gender in Science (4)

 

NURS 330

Human Reproductive Health (4)

Social Sciences

(d) ANTH

338

Gender Roles in Cross-Cultural  Perspectives (4)

(d) HIST

357

Gender in History  (4)

(d) POLS

310

Gender, Politics, and Government (4)

(d) SOC

341

Sociology of Gender Roles (4)

Humanities

(d)COMM 385/ENGL

Sex and Gender in Language and Literature (4)

(d) ENGL/TVF 379

Gender and Sexuality in Popular Culture (4)

(d) PHIL 327

Philosophy, Gender and Culture (4)

(d) RELS 335

Gender in the Diversity of World Religions (4)

(d) Approved diversity course

D.     Urban Life and Environment

This theme contributes to an understanding of urbanization, its causes and consequences, and the urban experience from a variety of points of view.  Courses explore the city as a special kind of human habitat and the relations between social and natural environments.  Students gain the tools to comprehend the social, political, economic and cultural complexities of cities and the human and natural forces that shape urban life, experiences and environments.

Natural Sciences and Mathematics
 

CE 352

Technological Aspects of the Urban Environment (4)

 

GEOG/HS 309

Urban Environmental Pollution (4)

 

GEOG 310

Urban Climatology (4)

 

GEOL 357

Urban Geology (4)

Social Sciences

(d)CHDV 321

Urban Families: Contemporary Issues (4)

 

GEOG 376

Urban Spatial Processes and Patterns (4)

 

HIST 383

Rise of Urban America (4)

 

SOC 330

Social Issues in the Urban Setting (4)

Humanities
 

ART 317

Visual Arts in Urban Contexts (4)

(d)COMM 389

Intercultural Communication in the Urban Environment (4)

 

ML 300

Language Diversity in Urban  America (4)

 

TAD 316

Theatre and Dance in the 20th Century Urban Contexts (4)

E.     The Diversity of Human Emotions

The Diversity of Human Emotions theme uses emotion as a window into cultures, because emotional diversity reflects the diversity of humankind.  As a biological process that is shaped into varieties by culture, emotion is an ideal topic for gaining insights into the social lives of ethnic groups, the genders, and the social classes.  The theme emphasizes these dimensions of diversity and portrays not only cultural diversity, but also teaches techniques for control over prejudice, suspicion, antagonism and other emotional states creating conflict among social groups.

Natural Sciences and Mathematics
 

ANTH

300 Evolutionary Perspectives on Emotions (4)

 

PSY

323 Psychology of Emotion and Motivation (4)

Social Sciences

(d) HIST 356

History of Emotions (4)

(d) PAS 369

Race, Activism, and Emotions (4)

(d) RELS 380

Emotion in Religion (4)

(d) SOC 300

Cultural Emotion (4)

(d) Approved diversity course

Humanities
 

(d)CHS/ENGL/PAS 327

Ethnicity and Emotions in U.S.  Film (4)

 

ENGL/ML389

Human Emotions in Literary Expression (4)

 

PHIL 372

Philosophy and the Emotions (4)

 

TA/TVF 380

Emotion in Theatre and Film (4)

F.     Human Maturity and Aging Processes and Problems

This theme addresses major life issues that confront individuals in maturity and adulthood.  It provides a multidisciplinary approach to the study of human aging through examination of the biological bases of aging, the cultural, social, political and psychological implications of maturity and aging, and the religious, literary and philosophical concepts of age and aging.

Natural Sciences and Mathematics
 

BIOL

384N Biology of Human Aging (4)

 

KIN

345 Physiological Effects of Exercise During Aging (4)

 

NTRS

351 Adult Nutrition (4)

Social Sciences
 

(d)ANTH

335 Maturity and Aging in Cross-Cultural Perspectives (4)

 

POLS

330 Politics of Aging (4)

 

PSY

362 Psychological and Psychosocial Developmental Stages in Maturity and Aging (4) 

      (d)SOC

323 Socialization: Maturity and Aging (4)

Humanities
 

ENGL

383 Narratives of Maturity and Aging (4)

 

ML

382 Maturity and Aging in East Asia and Romance Literatures (4)

 

(d)PHIL

373 Themes of Adult Life in Philosophy (4)

 

(d)RELS

325 Themes of Adult Life in the World’s Religions (4)

(d) Approved diversity course

G.     The Global Environment:  Past, Present, and Future
Note: Effective Fall Quarter 2004, Theme G is discontinued.  Only students who started Theme G prior to Fall, 2004 may enroll in Theme G courses.

This theme explores how the global environment and its resource have evolved, how the environment works and how humans precipitate, exacerbate, and are affected by global change.  The future of humanity within a sustainable world society is addressed.  The theme emphasizes the moral responsibilities of individuals in solving environment problems.  The interconnectedness of the natural and social sciences and the humanities is stressed in an attempt to understand ourselves and our need to learn from and work with the global environment rather than to conquer it.

Natural Sciences and Mathematics
 

BIOL 341N/GEOL 341

Evolution of Earth and Life through Time (4)

 

CE/GEOG 358

Environment, Earth Systems and Technology (4)

Social Sciences
 

GEOG/POLS 322

Global Change and the Human Condition (4)

 

GEOG 341

World Resources and Environmental Issues (4)

Humanities
 

ART 315

The Arts and the Environment (4)

H.     Race, Diversity, And Justice

“Race, Diversity and Justice” is a theme that integrates the investigation of contemporary issues of racism and social injustice with the goal of understanding what attitudes and behaviors prevent equal treatment for all peoples.  This theme presents the conceptual and historical background necessary for responsible and moral judgement, subsequent action, and the embracement of cultural diversity in a world that is composed of many cultures and societies.

Natural Sciences and Mathematics
 

ANTH  361

Race, Racism, and Human Variation (4)

 

ANTH/PHIL  385

Measurement of Human Difference (4)

 

HS 370

Environmental Racism (4)

Social Sciences

(d)COMM/POLS

342

Rights and Justice in Communication and Politics (4)

(d)HIST

352

Civil Rights in the United States (4)

(d) SOC

348

Class, Race/Ethnicity and Gender (4)

(d)SW

362

From Institutional Racism to Cultural Competency (4)

Humanities

(d)ENGL/PAS

377

Literary Explorations of Justice and Racism (4)

(d)CHS/LAS  

335

Race and Culture in the Americas (4)

(d)PHIL 

323

Human Diversity and Justice (4)

(d)TVF

334

“Race,” Justice and Mass Media (4)

(d) Approved diversity course

I.     Ancients And Moderns

The Ancients and Moderns theme provides an integrated introduction to the interaction of the principal civilizations of the Mediterranean basin—Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece, and Rome—to form the “Classical Tradition” and the significance of that tradition for the understanding of Western and Islamic Civilization in general and the culture of the Americas in particular.  Comparisons will be made with East Asian Civilization.

Natural Sciences and Mathematics
 

ASTR 360

Ancient and Modern View of the Universe (4)

 

CHEM 380N/HIST/PHIL 380

Ancient and Modern Science (4)

 

ENGR/TECH 383

Ancient and Modern Technology (4)

 

NTRS 357

The Changing Food Supply: Impact on Health (4)

Social Sciences
 

ANTH 355

Cultural Evolution and Ancient  Civilizations (4)

 

(d)HIST 311

Classical Civilization and the Modern World (4)

 

(d)POLS 348

Issues in Ancient and Modern Political Thought (4)

 

(d)RELS 311

Seeking the Holly: Sacred Texts, Sacred Objects, Sacred Rituals (4)

Humanities
 

AAAS 350

Ancient East Asian Literature and the Modern World (4)

 

CHS/ML 312

Mediterranean and Pre-Columbian Myths in Latin American Literature (4)

 

ENGL 381

Legacy of Greek and Roman  Literature (4)

 

PHIL 321

Ancient Thought and its Modern  Legacy (4)

(d) Approved diversity course

Service-Learning Courses

Service-Learning Definition

Consistent with the special mission at Cal State L.A. to provide an educational experience that recognizes and takes full advantage of diversity while emphasizing the knowledge, experience and ethical concerns common to all people, service learning at California State University, Los Angeles

     is a teaching and learning strategy that provides students with organized and meaningful learning experience outside the classroom designed

     to enhance their understanding of information, knowledge and theoretical principles shared in the classroom;

     is also defined as a pedagogical model that links course content with a community service component that is designed to address the needs

     identified by  the community whether local or global; and

     has, as an integral component, the use of reflective activities intended to integrate course content and skills and knowledge with community

     involvement and to develop or strengthen students' commitment to social responsibility and civic engagement. 

Sections of the following courses offer service-learning opportunities.  Please consult department/division/school for course offerings.

Lower Division Courses

TECH 231

Imposition and Electronic Image Assembly (3)

TECH 232

Electronic Prepress Systems (3)

TECH 291

Computers in Technology (3)

Lower Division GE Courses

AAAS 200

Pacific Asian Culture, People, and Society (4) GE D

ART 209

Perspectives on Art, Diversity and World Culture (4)  GE C2

HIST 150

Asian-American History (4) GE D

LBS 234

Multicultural Arts, L.A. (4)  GE C2

PHIL 220

Contemporary Moral and Social Issues in Multicultural Society (4) GE C3

PHIL 230

Meanings of Human Life: Multicultural Approach (4) GE E

POLS 150

Government and American Society (4) GE AM

SOC 202

Society and Individual Development (4) GE E

SPAN 205B

Intermediate Written Spanish (4, 4) GE C4

TECH 250

Impact of Technology on the Individual and Society (4) GE E

WOMN 203

Gender and Race in the United States (4)   GE D

Upper Division GE Theme Courses

ANTH 335

Maturity and Aging in Cross-Cultural Perspective (4) GE Theme F

ART 317

Visual Art in Urban Contexts (4) GE Theme D

ENGL 381

Legacy of Greek and Roman Literature (4) GE Theme I

KIN 345

Physiological Effects of Exercise During Aging (4) GE Theme F

PHIL 323

Human Diversity and Justice (4) GE Theme H

PHIL 327

Philosophy, Gender and Culture (4) GE Theme C

PSY 309

Human Violence and Individual Change (4) GE Theme B

SOC  323

Socialization: Maturity and Aging (4)  GE Theme F

SOC 348

Class, Race/Ethnicity, and Gender  (4) GETheme H

Upper Division Courses

AAAS/ANTH 415

Asian American Communities in Southern California (4)

ART 400

Elementary Classroom Visual Art  (3)

ART 468

Problems in Advanced Design (4)

ART 487

Advanced Photography (4)

CHS 432

Chicanos and the War on Drugs (4)

CHS 450

Research on Community Problems (4)

CHS 470

Chicano Educational Studies (4)

CHDV 340

Middle Childhood and Adolescence (4)

COMM      477

Qualitative Methods in Communication (4)

CRIM 450

Social Institutions and Crime (4)

EDAD 520

Instructional Leadership (4)

EDCI  541

Field Work in Reading and Language Arts (4)

EDSP 301

Individuals with Disabilities in Contemporary Society (3)

ENGL 301

Introduction to Language (4)

ENGL 430

Children’s Literature  (4)

ENGL  452

Reading Cultures: Cultural Studies and English Literature (4)

ENGL 476

Ethnic Literature in the US (4)

HIST 483

Poverty and Anti-Poverty in American History (4)

KIN 422

Community Service Learning and Physical Activity Programs (4)

KIN 436B

Mobility Training Practicum (2)

KIN 439

Rehabilitation Exercise Machines (3)

KIN 490

Capstone Seminar (4)

KIN 548

Physical Activity Program Leadership (4)

LAS 460

Labor and Social Movements in the Americas (4)

MATH 395

Classroom Experiences in Teaching High School Mathematics (2)

MGMT 468

Small Business Management (4)

NTRS 418

Community Nutrition (4)

PHIL 395

Philosophy in Practice: Internships and Service Learning (1-3)

PSY 445

Community Psychology - Service Learning (4)

SOC 331

The Dynamics of Poverty (4)

SOC 414

Contemporary Sociological Theory (4)

SOC 428

Self and Identity (4)

TECH 430

Computer Aided Graphic Communications Management (3)

TECH 432

Typographical Layout and Design (3)

TECH 436

Electronic Publishing Technology and Management (3)

For more information about service-learning and community engagement at CSULA, please contact Associate Dean of Undergraduate Studies (323-343-3830), or Faculty Director of Service Learning (323-343-3372).

Teaching Credentials: Basic Information on Undergraduate Preparation

Basic Teaching Credentials

The Charter College of Education has a long and successful history of preparing teachers for the challenges of California's urban classrooms.  It is recognized by both the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CCTC) and the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) for its exemplary programs. For students interested in obtaining a Multiple Subject, Education Specialist (Special Education), or Single Subject credential, appropriate degree programs are listed below.  Each degree program (or a specific option within it) has been approved by the CCTC for waiver of the subject area examination for the credential indicated.  Interested students should consult advisers in both the appropriate academic department and the Charter College of Education.

Multiple Subject Credential Program

The Multiple Subject teaching credential authorizes holders to teach in preschool and kindergarten, grades 1-12, and adult education classes in self-contained classrooms in which all subjects are taught.  University internship credential programs are also offered in cooperation with many surrounding school districts.

Single Subject Credential Program

The Single Subject teaching credentials authorize holders to teach in preschool and kindergarten, grades 1-12, and adult education classes in departmentalized classrooms.  See Single Subject Credential Areas of Authorization below.

Education Specialist Credential Programs

The approved program at California State University, Los Angeles includes the following programs:
·      Internship Credentials in Special Education
·     Level I or Preliminary Credentials
·     Level II or Professional Specialist Credentials
·     Programs that combine a Specialist with a Multiple or Single Subject Credential
·     Specialist Program combined with a Master of Arts degree in Special Education

The Education Specialist Credential Programs are also approved by the Commission on Teacher Credentialing to include English Learner Authorization. The following is a list of Education Specialist Credential program areas.  The student must also read the advisement material of the Division of Special Education and Counseling and must consult with a faculty adviser.

Early Childhood Special Education:  Preparation to work with infants and young children birth-pre-K with disabilities or at-risk, and their families.

Moderate/Severe Disabilities: Preparation to teach students K-12 with moderate/severe disabilities, mental retardation, emotional/behavioral disabilities and multiple disabilities within the full range of placement options.

Physical and Health Impairments: Preparation to teach students birth - 22 years with orthopedic disabilities and other serious health impairments, traumatic brain injury, and multiple disabilities within the full range of placement options

Visual Impairments and Blindness: Preparation to teach students birth-22 years who are blind or who have low vision, including students with additional disabilities within the full range of placement options.

Note:  Candidates are responsible for examinations required by the State of California and may consult the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing website at www.ctc.ca.gov or consult with an advisor for current policies.

Other Specialist Program Areas:

Adapted Physical Education Credential: The Adapted Physical Education Specialist Credential meets the subject matter requirements and entitles the holder to teach adapted physical education in California to individuals between the ages of 3 and 21 years who have exceptional needs.

Clinical Rehabilitative Services Credential: The Clinical Rehabilitative Services Credential with authorizations in Audiology, Language, Speech and Hearing (Special Class Authorization Option), and Orientation and Mobility for the Blind and Visually Impaired training prepares individuals to work with children and adults who have disabilities that necessitate this type of training.

Health Services Credential: School Nurse: This program qualifies nursing professionals for employment as school nurses in California public schools.

Reading/Language Arts Credential: The Reading/Language Arts Credential is designed for teachers who wish to become reading and language arts specialists in public or private schools and clinics in California.

Elementary Subject Matter Teacher Options for the Multiple Subject Credential or Education Specialist (Special Education)
(For Students Interested in Obtaining a Degree Prior to Enrollment in a Credential Program)

All Cal State L.A. students who enter an elementary subject matter preparation program for the Multiple Subject credentials must complete a 112 unit common core as well as general education, major, and other graduation and credential requirements.  A grid that contains the common core appears later in this chapter. These core courses also meet lower division general education requirements.  (Refer to Lower Division General Education grid elsewhere in this chapter.)  Consult a faculty adviser in your major department for further information.

ElementarySubject Matter Preparation Programs for the Multiple Subject or the Education Specialist Credential are offered with the following undergraduate degrees:
·     Child Development, B.A., Option II
·     Liberal Studies, B.A.
·     Mexican-American Studies, B.A.

Blended Elementary Subject Matter Options.
(For students interested in obtaining a bachelor's degree concurrently with their Multiple Subject Credential or Education Specialist Internship Credential)

Students must complete a 198-unit program which includes specified university, general education, major, additional subject matter, credential and other graduation and credential requirements.  A grid labled "Blended Elementary  Subject Matter Option" containing these core requirements appears later in this chapter.  The following undergraduate degrees are available:

·     Child Development, B.A., Option III
·     Liberal Studies, B.A.
·     Mexican-American Studies, B.A.
·     Urban Learning, B.A.

Subject Matter Preparation for the Single Subject Credential

Candidates for the California Single Subject teaching credential must verify subject matter competence in their designated teaching field by one of the following methods:

1.     completing an approved academic program of course work (or its equivalent) in the selected subject-matter area, or
2.     passing the required examination(s) for the subject matter area in which the credential is sought.*

*This option is not available for Physical Education.  Please consult the School of Kinesiology and Nutritional Science.

Single Subject Credential Authorized Areas

Degree Program

Art

Art, B.A.

English

English, B.A.

English

Speech Communication, B.A.

Language Other Than English

French, B.A.

Language Other Than English

Japanese, B.A.

Language Other Than English

Spanish, B.A.

Mathematics

Mathematics, B.A., B.S.

Music

Music, B.A.

Physical Education

Kinesiology, B.S.

Science: Biological Science

Natural Science, B.S

Science: Chemistry

Natural Science, B.S

Science: Geoscience

Natural Science, B.S

Science: Physics

Natural Science, B.S.

Social Science

History, B.A.

Supplementary Authorizations

The holder of a multiple subject or a single subject teaching credential issued by the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing may have one or more of the subjects commonly taught in departmentalized classes added to the credential as a supplementary authorization by verifying completion of the requirements specified in Title 5, California Code of Regulations, 80057.5, or 80089, 80089.1, and 80089.2.  Supplementary authorizations cannot be issued in any subject that falls within the statutory single subject category of an applicant's single subject teaching credential.

Contact the Office for Student Services in the Charter College of Education (KH D2078) for information concerning the specific requirements for subjects approved for supplementary authorization and the procedure to apply to the Commission.

Information about additional credential programs appears in the Graduate and Postbaccalaureate Study: General Information chapter.

Elementary Subject Matter Teacher Preparation Program Common Core
For Students Beginning Program Fall 2003 or Later

Note: Grade of "C" or higher required in all courses
Only articulated courses will be acceptable for ESM transfer credit, with the exception of GE Block A3

Course Abbreviation, Number, Title

Quarter Units

Course Abbreviation, Number, Title

Quarter Units

Common Core Courses

 

Common Core Courses

 

UNIVERSITY REQUIREMENTS
(2 units)

CRITICAL THINKING (4 units)
Any certified A3 GE course or

Introduction to Higher Education or
Transition to Cal State L.A.
________________________

UNIV 400 Writing Proficiency Examination (WPE)

(2)

__________________________

(0)

* COMM 176 Argumentation or*
PHIL 160 Critical Thinking or*
PHIL 250 Introduction to Symbolic Logic or*
POLS 155 Critical Analysis of Political Communication

(4)

READING LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE (24 units)

MATHEMATICS(12 units)

*COMM 150  Oral Communication

(4)

MATH 110 Foundations of the Real Number System for Elementary & Middle School Teachers

(4)

ENGL 101 Composition

(4)

*MATH 115 Elements of Algebra & Statistics for Elementary & Middle School Teachers

(4)

ENGL 102 Composition II

(4)

MATH 225 Exploration in Geometry for Elementary & Middle School Teachers

(4)

ENGL 250 Understanding Literature or
ENGL 258 Mythology in Literature


(4)

 

ENGL 301 Introduction to Language

(4)

ENGL 430 Children's Literature

(4)

*Basic Subject Courses - All basic subjects must be completed within the first 45 units counted toward the baccalaureate degree.

HISTORY AND SOCIAL SCIENCE (20 units)

Course Abbreviation, Number, Title                    Quarter Units

VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS (12 units)

Course Abbreviation, Number, Title                    Quarter Units

HIST 110A World Civilization I

(4)

ART 400 Elementary Classroom Visual Arts

(3)

HIST 110B World Civilization II

(4)

DANC 400 Creative Dance in the Elementary Classroom

(3)

HIST202A United States Civilization (Col. to Civil War)

(4)

MUS 400 Elementary Classroom Music

(3)

HIST488 California or
CHS 443 History of the Chicano People in California

(4)

TA 400 Creative Drama for the Elementary Classroom

(3)

POLS 150 Government and American Society

(4)

PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND HEALTH (8 units)

SCIENCE (18 units)

KIN 150 Fitness and Wellness in Contemporary Society

(4)

BIOL 180 Life Science for Elementary Teachers

(4)

KIN 420 Develoment of Physical Activity

(3)

BIOL 181 Life Science Seminar for Elementary Teachers

(2)

HS 457 Health Education for School Teachers

(1)

NATS 180 Motion and Energy for Elementary Teachers

(3)

HUMAN DEVELOPMENT (12 units)

NATS 181 Structure and Properties of Matter for Elementary Teachers

(3)

CHDV 140 Child Development

(4)

NATS 182 Topics in Space Science for Elementary Teachers

(2)

CHDV/PSY 343 Child and Adolescent Cognition

(4)

NATS 183 Earth Science for Elementary Teachers

(4)

CHDV 350 Social and Emotional Development or
SOC 322 Socialization: Childhood and Adolescence

(4)

TOTAL COMMON CORE UNITS REQUIRED =112

Option II - (BA with PostBaccalaureate Credential)
Mexican-American, Child Development, Liberal Studies (180 units)
COURSES FOR COMPLETION OF GE REQUIREMENTS

BA Mexican-American Studies-Traditional

Block C - select two courses from Block C (no C1) (8)
Upper division GE theme (12)
Diversity requirement- if not met with the above courses, select 2 Diversity courses from General Education program

(20) units

BA Liberal Studies - Traditional-

Block C - select one course from Block C (no C1) (4)
Block D - select one course from Block D (no HIST) (4)
Upper division GE theme (12)
Diversity requirement- if not met with the above courses, select 2 Diversity courses from General Education program

(20) units

BA Child Development-Traditional

Block C - select two courses from Block C (no C1) (8)
Upper division GE theme (12)
Diversity requirement- if not met with the above courses, select 2 Diversity courses from General Education program

(20) units

Option III - (BA Degree and Credential)
Mexican-American, Child Development, Liberal Studies,
Urban Learning (198 units)

 

Note: A 2.75 is required in the last 90 units for entry into the blended options upon transfer.

 

Academic Support Programs

Center for Environmental Analysis-Centers for Research Excellence in Science and Technology (CEA-CREST)

CEA-CREST aims to conduct innovative environmental research and to increase the number of students from underrepresented backgrounds entering careers in the environmental sciences.  The program fosters superb educational experiences by employing graduates and undergraduates in multi-disciplinary research teams tackling significant environmental problems and led by outstanding faculty researchers. Teams work on campus and at sites across the globe. CEA-CREST provides generous financial stipends for students, plus funds for travel to and research.  For further information, contact the CEA-CREST office at (323) 343-5799, e-mail ceacrest@calstatela.edu, or Website http://cea-crest.calstatela.edu.

Health Science Advisement Office (HCAO)

In general, students planning to enter a school of dentistry, medicine, optometry, pharmacy, podiatry, or veterinary medicine should elect a major related to their own interests and include appropriate science courses as part of their major, general education, or electives. Medical schools expect students to show proficiency in English, mathematical reasoning, and fundamentals of physical and biological sciences.  Some medical schools also require work in the social sciences, humanities, and a foreign language.  Most expect completion of a baccalaureate program. The advisory staff serving preprofessional students in medical and related health fields includes two appointed health science advisers and a supporting group of faculty members in the departments of Biological Sciences, Chemistry and Biochemistry, Physics and Astronomy, and Psychology.  Medical sciences advisement and recommendations are coordinated through the Health Careers Advisement Office (HCAO) in Lib. PW 1040A, (323) 343-3150, fax 323-343-6311.  Students planning careers in these areas should visit the office for guidance about programs and application procedures, irrespective of their declared major.  The staff has prepared a number of brochures that answer most of the students' initial questions about the various health science careers.  The center also contains current catalogs for every health science professional school in the United States as well as information about foreign schools, financial aid, and alternative careers.

Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation (LSAMP)

LSAMP is a comprehensive, statewide program dedicated to increasing the number of students from underrepresented minority groups (URM) graduating from campuses of the California State University with baccalaureate degrees in science, engineering, and mathematics (SEM) disciplines. It is funded by the National Science Foundation. Initiated in 1994, the CSU-LSAMP Alliance currently consists of 19 campuses of the California State University (CSU), each of which is partnered with at least one California Community College (CCC). In Phase III, a new emphasis has been placed on activities designed to enhance graduate school preparedness of upper division students.

CSU, Los Angeles is partnered with East Los Angeles College and Pasadena City College and currently has the largest LSAMP program with over 700 students participating each year. Eligible majors are biochemistry, biology, chemistry, civil engineering, computer science, electrical engineering, geology, mathematics, mechanical engineering, microbiology, other engineering, and physics. Activities include summer and academic year (AY) workshop to enhance performance in specific math and science courses; AY or summer SEM research experiences; AY or summer internships; GRE preparation workshops; participation in scientific and professional conferences; graduation application assistance; graduate school application assistance; and participation in the CSU-LSAMP Scholars Program.

For further information about the LSAMP program and application forms, contact Dr. Margaret Jefferson, LSAMP Coordinator, Department of Biological Sciences, (323) 343-2059 or lsamp@calstatela.edu.

Minority Access to Research Careers (MARC)

The MARC Honors Undergraduate Research Training Program trains up to 10 academically accomplished (B or higher grade point average) natural and behavioral science juniors and seniors who can compete successfully for entry into graduate programs leading to the Ph.D.  in the biomedical sciences or an M.D.–Ph.D. degree.

Student fellows perform research under the direction of faculty who are engaged in biomedical research.  A stipend is provided for each student fellow.  In addition, the program provides payment of student registration fees, funds for research supplies, and a travel allowance for fellows to attend scientific meetings to present research papers.  A participant’s tenure in the program is two years for trainees entering as juniors and one year for those entering as seniors.

For further information about the MARC program and applications forms, write or phone Dr. Carlos G. Gutiérrez, Director, MARC Program, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, (323) 343-2300.

Minority Biomedical Research Support Program (MBRS)

Designed to increase the pool of underrepresented minority biomedical scientists, the MBRS provides annual salaries for undergraduate and graduate students to participate in original research projects in collaboration with experienced faculty mentors.

Students are also given excellent opportunities to obtain experience in contemporary and sophisticated biomedical research, a seminar series presented by distinguished scientists, and travel to national and regional scientific meetings.  For further information, contact the MBRS office at (323) 343-2395.

MESA Engineering Program (MEP)

ing and computer science majors.  MEP provides support by building its students into a high-achieving academic community.  MEP services include scholarships, counseling, advising, an orientation course, a study center, study groups, employment assistance, and pre-professional career development through student organizations.  MEP students learn to work cooperatively in a supportive environment.  For further information, contact the MEP office, E&T A409, or call (323) 343-4527.

Students Learning in Communities (SLC)

Students Learning in Communities (SLC) is a learning community program that offers exciting academic courses and social activities, to cohorted groups of students, and is designed to enhance the academic and social experiences of CSULA students. Developmental learning communities are available to first-time freshman who need to complete a sequence of developmental math and English courses in preparation for college-level study. Thematic General Education learning communities link two or more GE courses in the same quarter and are open to students fulfilling General Education requirements. For further information, contact the SLC Office, Library, Palmer Wing 1040A, (323) 343-3184.

Computing Facilities

Cal State L.A. provides the latest information technology resources to students, faculty and staff, and houses more than 35 electronic classrooms with networked computers, six large student open access computer labs, three training labs, and many other "smart" classrooms.  Students have access to a variety of state-of-the-art computers, with more than 200 software packages, applications, and plug-ins including the latest Web browsers, on every workstation on campus. Access from off-campus - including e-mail, electronic Library resources, learning management system, and student system (GET) - is easily accessible via the Internet.  For those without an Internet connection, a modem pool is available. Our sophisticated computers, specialized labs, and variety of software applications reflect the University's pursuit of academic excellence and the high standards demanded by our students.

A walk-up help desk is available six days a week to assist students, faculty and staff with computer and network related problems, phone support is available after hours.

Open Access Laboratories

Open Access labs are available to students during daytime, evening, and weekend hours. The labs are staffed by qualified student technology assistants who answer questions and provide assistance. Further information about the Open Access Computer Labs can be obtained by visiting the computer lab website at http://www.calstatela.edu/oal

Preprofessional Study

Students who wish to prepare for professional study in engineering and the natural sciences, as well as the fields of law, librarianship, or medicine and health sciences will find specialized counseling and advisement at Cal State L.A.  Such preprofessional advisement is separate from and in addition to major program advisement.  Students are urged to consult current catalogs of professional schools available in the Reference Room of the Library for specific requirements, or to contact the advisement offices named below.

Health Related Programs

Cal State L.A. offers a wide range of programs in health and health-related fields.  These programs have a strong clinical and field placement component at several leading health care facilities and clinics in the metropolitan area to prepare graduates to enter the health field as professionals.  Additional information is available from the Coordinator of Health-Related Programs, Biological Sciences 125, (323) 343-2035.  Programs and the departments, divisions, and schools that offer them include:

Program 

Department or Division

Phone
Area Code (323)

Audiology

Communication  Disorders

343-4690

Dietetics

Kinesiology and Nutritional Science

343-4650

Exercise and Human Performance

Kinesiology and Nutritional Science

343-4650

Health Care Management

Management

343-2895

Health Science

Health Science

343-4740

Microbiology

Biological Sciences

343-2050

Nursing

Nursing

343-4700

Nutrition

Kinesiology and Nutritional Science

343-4650

Physical Education for Exceptional Individuals

Kinesiology  and Nutritional Science

343-4650

Physical Therapy

Kinesiology and Nutritional Science

343-4650

Preprofessional Program for Medicine, Dentistry, Optometry, Pharmacy, Physician Assistant, Podiatry and Veterinary Medicine

Health Science Advisement Office

343-4689

Rehabilitation and Therapeutic Exercise

Kinesiology  and Nutritional Science

343-4650

Rehabilitation Counseling

Special Education and Counseling

343-4250

Social Work

Social Work

343-4680

Special Education

Special Education and Counseling

343-4400

Speech-Language Pathology

Communication Disorders

343-4690

Law

Students considering a career in law may select from a broad range of majors. Law schools are interested in students  knowledge of human institutions and values and their critical thinking, analytical writing and communication skills. There is no preferred major or course of study at the baccalaureate level. The major should be chosen based upon the student’s interest since a good academic record in a rigorous course of study is more important for admission to law school than the major. Students should be mindful that not everyone is accepted to an accredited law school. Thus, a consideration in selecting a major should be alternative career paths in the event that one is not admitted or changes career goals.

As part of the range of majors offered at Cal State L.A., most of which are acceptable for law school admission, there are three options which are specified as prelegal. They are the Prelegal option in the Bachelor of Arts degree in Political Science, the Business Arts-Prelegal option in the Bachelor of Science degree in Business Administration, and the Prelaw option in the Bachelor of Arts degree in Philosophy.  Two additional choices are the Prelaw minors offered by the Department of Philosophy and the Department of Political Science.

Prelegal advisement is available in the Departments of Finance and Law, Philosophy, and Political Science. Students interested in a career in law, regardless of major, are encouraged to consult with any of these departments on choice of major and expectations of law schools.

Prelaw students are expected to take the Law School Aptitude Test (LSAT) in the fall quarter of the year preceding their anticipated admission to law school.  Application forms may be obtained during the Spring Quarter in the Political Science department office.

Librarianship

The field of librarianship provides careers with diverse opportunities and room for personal and professional growth.  The information field is growing, and the work of librarians is expanding to keep pace.  Every day librarians sift through clues, uncover facts, and help people weave knowledge from threads of information.

Many libraries also have support and paraprofessional positions that do not require a library science degree but offer valuable experience for someone interested in pursuing work in libraries. For more information, write to Library Careers, ALA/OLPR, 50 East Huron Street, Chicago, Illinois 60611.

Physical Therapy

The School of Kinesiology and Nutritional Science (schoolkns@calstatela.edu, 323-343-4650) may be contacted for advisement about undergraduate course work and other requirements for admission to graduate  degree programs in physical therapy. Physical therapists evaluate, treat and educate people with the goal of restoring, maintaining, and improving their muscular strength, musculoskeletal flexibility, and neuromuscular coordination. They work in medical, health, and educational settings. Admission criteria usually include specified undergraduate course work completed with an acceptable grade point average, and a specified number of hours of paid or volunteer work in physical therapy settings. Students are urged to look closely at the particular admissions requirements of the colleges to which they plan to apply.

A complete listing of colleges and universities offering graduate degrees in physical therapy is available at the website of the American Physical Therapy Association www.apta.org, or write the organization at 111 North Fairfax Street, Alexandria, VA 22314; phone (703)-684-APTA.

Credit Certificate Programs

Certificate programs are designed to augment University curricula by providing specialized instruction and training within a field.  These programs usually require significantly fewer units than a degree major.  An undergraduate credit certificate program must contain a minimum of 24 quarter units and a graduate level program, 16 units.  Normally, courses in certificate programs will be upper division or graduate level, except for prerequisites.  Students may transfer from another institution no more than one quarter of the total units required for a certificate (75% of the course work must be completed at Cal State L.A.). A maximum of one quarter (25%) of the total units required for a certificate may be devoted to internships or independent study, or a combination of both.  The minimum grade point average required for completion of an undergraduate credit certificate program is C (2.0), and for postbaccalaureate certificates, B (3.0). These grade point average requirements do not pertain to noncredit certificate programs.  A Certificate of Completion is awarded upon successful completion of the program requirements.  Some certificates are offered within degree majors and can be applied toward a baccalaureate or a master’s degree; others are offered through Extended Education with the certificate being the main goal.

Cal State L.A. offers the following credit certificate programs that are open to qualified undergraduate students.  Additional postbaccalaureate and graduate level programs are listed in the Graduate and Postbaccalaureate Study chapter.  Individual certificate program requirements and required courses appear in the program listings of the academic departments, divisions, schools and colleges that offer them.

Accounting

Offered by the Department of Accounting, (323) 343-2830, the program is designed to provide an organized series of courses in accounting for students in other majors who wish to qualify to take a professional accounting examination, to meet civil service educational requirements for employment as a professional accountant or auditor, or to acquire the skills needed for employment as a professional accountant in private industry.

Advanced Information Systems

Offered by the Department of Information Systems, (323) 343-2983, the program is designed to give individuals who are pursuing or have earned a degree in business administration (or have equivalent experience) an introduction to the techniques of information systems design, planning, and management.  Applicable toward degrees in business administration.

Alcohol and Drug Problems Specialist

Offered by the Department of Health Science, (323) 343-4740, the certificate prepares students to work in community agencies involved with alcohol and/or drug related problems.  Applicable toward degree programs in health science.

Alternative Nutrition

Offered by the School of Kinesiology and Nutritional Science, (323) 343-4650, this program may be taken by coordinated dietetics and nutritional science students in upper division standing. Health professionals in such disciplines as dietetic technician, health science, nursing, medicine, pharmacy, dentistry, biology and chemistry would also find this program useful.

Applied Gerontology

Offered by the College of Health and Human Services through the Applied Gerontology Institute, (323) 343-4724, this program is designed to enhance the preparation of individuals enrolled in courses or working in health-related disciplines to exercise their effectiveness as practitioners with older populations, particularly ethnic minorities.  The program includes instruction about aging in several domains: biological, social/psychological, and policy-social services.

Child Maltreatment and Family Violence

Offered by the College of Health and Human Services, (323) 343-4696, the program provides individuals from various disciplines with expanded knowledge and formalized education in the area of child abuse and domestic violence, training and field experience in serving this population, and opportunities to qualify for career positions in which multidisciplinary training is required or essential.

Computer Programming

Offered by the Department of Information Systems, (323) 343-2983, the program is designed to prepare individuals for entry-level computer programmer positions.  Courses in COBOL programming are required and other programming languages may be studied as electives.  Applicable toward the baccalaureate in Business Administration.  Also available through Extended Education, (323) 343-4900, for nonmatriculated students.

Entrepreneurship

Offered by the Department of Marketing, (323) 343-2960, the program is designed to prepare students and business people for careers in small companies: starting companies, managing small businesses, and working in small businesses.  The program includes instruction about how to take a product or service from the idea stage through the introduction and growth stages and how to successfully manage the business.  A focus may be taken in retailing, marketing of services and products, consulting, accounting, finance, or entrepreneurship.

Fashion Design

Offered by the Department of Art, (323) 343-4010, The department offers a certificate program in Fashion Design that prepares individuals for career positions in fashion design. The program includes technical methods, theory, and creative concepts.  A total of 42 units is required for completion of the certificate program, as outlined below.  Refer to the Undergraduate Study: General Information chapter of this catalog for general regulations governing all certificate programs.

Fashion Merchandising

Offered by the Department of Art, (323) 343-4010, The department offers a certificate program in Fashion Merchandising that prepares individuals for career positions in the fashion industry.  The program includes technical information, theory, and creative concepts.  A total of 40 units is required for completion of the certificate program, as outlined below.  Refer to the Undergraduate Study: General Information chapter of this catalog for general regulations governing all certificate programs.

Finance

Offered by the Department of Finance and Law, (323) 343-2870, the program is designed to prepare individuals who hold or are pursuing a bachelor’s degree in a field other than finance for entry into careers in corporate finance, money management, investment banking, and commercial banking.

Fire Protection Risk Analysis and Reduction

Offered by the Department of Technology, (323) 343-4550, the program offers students and individuals in the insurance industry and in private sector fire protection positions a series of professionally related courses in fire protection and fire safety.  The program prepares individuals to serve as fire protection and safety specialists, inspectors, evaluators, and managers.  Applicable toward the baccalaureate in fire protection administration and technology.

Fire Service Administration

Offered by the Department of Technology, (323) 343-4550, the program offers fire department personnel who hold an associate degree an opportunity to continue their knowledge and formalized education in the elements of effective modern fire department functioning.  Course work covers planning, prevention and disaster administration, public administration, and personnel and budgeting administration.  Applicable toward the baccalaureate in fire protection administration and technology.

General Management

Offered by the Department of Management,  (323) 343-2890, the certificate program is designed to prepare non-management option Business Administration Majors and non-business students for employment in a general management position, and to provide working and professional people the general management knowledge necessary for rapid career advancement.

Geographic Information Systems

Offered by the Department of Geography and Urban Analysis, (323) 343-2220, the program provides an analytical as well as a practical approach to the design, layout, and graphics needed in constructing and managing geographic information systems.

Human Resources Management

Offered by the Department of Management, (323) 343-2890, the certificate program is designed to prepare non-management option Business Administration Majors and non-business students for employment in human resources management positions, and to provide working and professional people the human resources management knowledge necessary for rapid career advancement.

Intercultural Proficiency

Offered by the School of Kinesiology and Nutritional Science, the Intercultural Proficiency Certificate Program, (323) 343-4650,  is designed to increase students' abilities to communicate and interact effectively within our increasingly multicultural living and working environment.  Achieving intercultural proficiency is a personal dynamic and developmental journey.  The overall goal of the program is to prepare our students to be change agents with the knowledge and skills that will enable organizations and institutions to accept, value and honor diversity.

International Business

Offered by the Department of Marketing, (323) 343-2960, the program prepares students for careers in firms operating on a multinational basis; for careers in import-export, international finance and banking, and international agencies; and for the Commerce Option of the Foreign Service Officer Examination with the federal government, and provides training for managers of internationally oriented companies in the Los Angeles area.  Applicable toward the baccalaureate in Business Administration.  This certificate program is also available through Extended Education, (323) 343-4900, for nonmatriculated students.

International Business Communication

Offered by the Department of  Marketing, (323) 343-2960, this certificate program affords the opportunity to combine language, culture, and communication and business knowledge.  The program will give business degree students a chance to add language and intercultural expertise, along with enhanced communication skills, to their program of study. At the same time, it will give language degree students, communication studies students, or area studies students a chance to add business courses to their program of study and obtain a certificate.  The certificate will enable students to pursue careers in organizations that want both recognized language skills and business training, such as international businesses, international foundations, non government organizations (NGOs), and international educational organizations.  The language, culture and communication components will also benefit students who obtain jobs in local organizations whose employees represent multiple cultures.

International Economic Relations

Offered by the Department of Economics and Statistics,    (323) 343-2930, the Certificate Program in International Economic Relations will benefit students to better understand the economic and political factors that influence the global economy. The certificate will help students pursuing careers in federal or state agencies dealing with international affairs, corporations involved in international business and finance, and in international organizations, foundations, and nongovernment agencies.

Labor Relations

Offered by the Department of Economics and Statistics,    (323) 343-2930, the Certificate Program in Labor Relations is designed to strengthen the skills of students interested in labor relation careers and improve access to career opportunities for administrators, mediators, arbitrators, and government labor officials.

Law Enforcement Leadership

Offered by the School of Criminal Justice and Criminalistics, (323) 343-4610), the Law Enforcement Leadership Credit Certificate Program is specifically designed to provide law enforcement personnel an opportunity to increase their expertise in leadership. The program uses a unique presentation model that is based on adult experiential learning theory. In each course the participants are required to continuously review concepts, values and principles in various combinations of increasing complexity. The courses enhance each participant's understanding of the importance of personal, interpersonal and organizational relationships, as well as the nature of human behavior and police management. Concepts such as responsibility, courage, leadership, organizational values, integrity, organizational design and ethics are presented.

Marketing

Offered by the Department of Marketing, (323) 343-2960, the program is designed to prepare students in majors other than business for professional careers in marketing in profit or nonprofit organizations.  Students may select a focus in marketing management, advertising, public relations, marketing research, retailing, direct response marketing, international marketing, transportation, or financial service marketing.  Applicable toward degree programs in business administration.  Also available through Extended Education, (323) 343-4900, for nonmatriculated students.

Operations Management

Offered by the Department of Management, (323) 343- 2890, the certificate program in operations management is designed to prepare non-management option business students and non-business students for employment in an operations management position, and to provide working and professional people with the operations management knowledge necessary for rapid career advancement.

Parent Educator

Offered by the Department of Child and Family Studies, (323) 343-4590, the program is designed to help individuals from varied backgrounds master the skills necessary to be qualified parent educators. This certificate program is also available through the Division of Extended Education, (323) 343-4900, for nonmatriculated students.

Retail Professional Development

Offered by the Department of Marketing, (323) 343-2960, in conjunction with the Institute of Retail Management, the program is designed to provide the skills required for executive positions in the retail industry and to prepare individuals to become successful entrepreneurs in their own retail business.  Available through Extended Education, (323) 343-4900, for nonmatriculated students.

Sports Nutrition

Offered by the School of Kinesiology and Nutritional Science, (323) 343-4650, the program is designed to provide students in health related disciplines information about diet and sports/exercise for healthy living.  Students planning a health related career would benefit by gaining the breath of knowledge and skills this certificate provides.

Transportation (Commercial)

Offered by the Department of Marketing, (323) 343-2960, the program is designed for individuals intending to pursue a career or enhance their advancement potential in the field of industrial traffic and transportation or carrier operation.  Applicable toward the baccalaureate in business administration.

Youth Agency Administration

Offered by the College of Health and Human Services the program is designed to prepare professionals for careers in non-profit management.   Applicable toward baccalaureate programs.

Recognition of Academic Excellence

Cal State L.A. recognizes superior academic achievement by conferring honors upon students with outstanding records at an annual spring Honors Convocation and at the annual Commencement Exercises in June.

Recognition is accorded at the annual Honors Convocation to undergraduate students placed on the Dean's List, those who were awarded Honors at Entrance and members of the General Education Honors Program,. Students receiving Special Recognition in Graduate Studies are also honored. Also recognized at the Honors Convocation are recipients of academic scholarship awards and juniors and seniors elected to membership in national honor societies.  The requirements for Honors at Entrance, Dean's List, and Certificate of Honor and Special Recognition in Graduate Studies awards are as follows:

Honors at Entrance

First-time freshmen who enter with a grade point average of 3.5 or higher on their high school record.

President's Scholars Program

The President's Scholarship is the most prestigious award offered by the University to incoming freshmen. Recipients receive $5,000 annually for a maximum of four years based on continuous full-time enrollment and academic performance.  Besides the scholarship, President's Scholars receive free on-campus parking, free admission to on-campus cultural and athletics events, priority registration, membership in the General Education Honors Program and are recognized at an annual reception with the University President. See the Scholarships section for full details.

Dean’s List

Undergraduate students who earn a 3.4 grade point average or higher for a quarter in which they complete 12 or more units of traditionally graded course work and who rank in the upper five percent of students in academic achievement within their college.  The preceding eligibility criteria also apply to graduate students seeking a second or subsequent baccalaureate.  Students will not be added retroactively to the Dean's List on the basis of completion of work in which the original grade was IC (Incomplete).

Graduation with Honors

Baccalaureate graduates of Cal State L.A. who maintain an outstanding scholarship record while earning the degree receive special recognition upon graduation.  Ten percent of the graduates in each college will receive honors:  the top 1% will receive summa cum laude, the next 4% will receive magna cum laude, and the next 5% will receive cum laude.  These percentages will be calculated only once for each academic year. The academic year is defined as summer, fall, winter, and spring quarters. At the beginning of each summer quarter, grade point average requirements for graduation with honors will be set by the Registrar's office.  These averages will be determined for each college by applying existing policy to students who have graduated during the past three years.*  During the following four quarters (summer, fall, winter, spring) all students attaining these minimum grade point averages will be awarded the corresponding honors at graduation independent of how many students received such honors.  Special majors will be included in the competition pool for honors at graduation computation in the college in which they have earned the most units toward their special major.  Rehabilitation services majors in the Charter College of Education will be included in the College of Health and Human Services for competition for honors at graduation. Students pursuing an advanced degree or a teaching credential are not eligible for such honors.

*Detailed method:  The Registrar will look at grade point averages for every student who graduated in a particular college during the past three years.  The percentage cutoffs in the current policy (i.e., 1% for summa cum laude, 4% for magna cum laude and 5% for cum laude) will be applied to this combined group to determine grade point average cutoffs for each school.

General Education Honors Program

Cal State L.A.'s General Education Honors Program provides highly qualified students with diverse, enriched intellectual activities through a separate curriculum which includes honors classes, seminars, and research.  Honors courses promote intellectual curiosity, critical reading, and logical thought and writing.  These courses have a lower student enrollment than other general education courses and are taught by the University's finest professors, many of whom are nationally recognized authorities in their field of study.  Honors students  encounter challenging and rewarding educational experiences. 

The General Education Honors Program:

·     Facilitates student participation in the National Collegiate Honors Council (NCHC) and the Western   Regional Honors Council (WRHC).

·     Provides high-potential students an opportunity to participate in intellectually demanding and academically challenging General education
     courses.

·     Offers opportunities for greater interaction with peers and involvement in interdisciplinary learning.

·     Identifies Cal State L.A. resources through which high-potential students can receive academic, personal, and career counseling to help
     them better define and reach their goals.

·     Creates opportunities for high-potential students and faculty members to establish closer educational relationships.

·     Prepares students for participation in upper division departmental honors programs.

     General Education Honors Program Students are offered the following special opportunities: 

·     Special sections of general education courses. Participation in courses appropriately modified in content, methodology, and level of
     enrichment for the high potential student.

·     Honor societies. Coordination of membership with other honors organizations.

·     Priority registration privileges. Students are allowed priority registration privileges.

·     Waiver of prerequisites. With department or division approval, students with appropriate background may be allowed to enroll in
     upper division
     courses without having met the usual lower division prerequisites.

·     Club membership. All program students are invited to hold membership in the General Education Honors Club.

Honors classes that meet general education requirements are available each quarter. These classes are designated as General Education Honors Program courses and enrollment is restricted to honors program students. All courses seek to explore more advanced and sophisticated areas of knowledge than regular general education offerings, although they meet general education requirements.  A higher level of achievement is expected.  Honors Program students are required to complete at least 24 units of these courses with a minimum B (3.0) grade point average to earn a General Education Honors Program certificate. 

For further information, contact the Program Director, Honors Program office, in the Library, Palmer Wing, phone (323) 343-4960.

Departmental Honors Programs

Further recognition of academic excellence is accorded through Cal State L.A.’s departmental honors programs, offered presently in anthropology, biology, chemistry, child development, and physics.  Students who maintain a superior grade point average and have faculty recommendation are permitted to enroll in an honors program in their elected major.  Considerable freedom is provided students and their advisers in designing enriched programs of study.  This may include deviation from traditional course patterns to permit additional work in subjects related to the major, more intensive study in subject areas of special interest, and participation in special colloquia, independent study, individual research, and honors theses.

Students who complete these honors programs receive citations of departmental honors on their transcripts and diplomas.

National Honor Societies

Chapters of more than twenty national honor societies have been chartered at Cal State L.A.  to accord recognition to students who demonstrate superior scholarship and leadership in academic areas.  A specific minimum grade point average, ranging from 3.0 to 3.85, is required for initiation into each of these honor societies.

National Honor Society

Discipline(s)

Alpha Kappa Delta, Iota Chapter

Sociology

Alpha Tau Delta, Phi Chapter

Nursing

Beta Alpha Psi, Beta Lambda Chapter

Accounting

Beta Beta Beta, Epsilon Theta  Chapter

Biological Sciences

Beta Gamma Sigma, Eta Chapter

Business

Chi Epsilon, Cal State L.A. Chapter

Civil Engineering

Delta Pi Epsilon, Beta Pi Chapter

Business Education

Epsilon Pi Tau, Alpha Psi Chapter

Technology

Eta Kappa Nu, Epsilon Nu Chapter

Electrical Engineering

Golden Key, Cal State L.A. Chapter

all academic disciplines

Kappa Delta Pi, Iota Phi Chapter

Education

Kappa Pi, Gamma Tau Chapter

Art

Omicron Delta Epsilon, Eta of California Chapter

Economics

Phi Alpha Theta, Eta Xi Chapter

History

Phi Beta Delta, Zeta Chapter

International scholars

Phi Delta Kappa, Campus Chapter No. 121

Education

Phi Kappa Phi, Cal State L.A. Chapter

all academic disciplines

Pi Delta Phi, Epsilon Nu Chapter

French

Pi Lambda Theta, Alpha Psi Chapter

Education

Pi Sigma Alpha, Gamma Omega Chapter

Political Science

Pi Tau Sigma, Sigma Kappa Chapter

Mechanical Engineering

Psi Chi, Cal State L.A. Chapter

Psychology

Sigma Delta Pi, Gamma Psi Chapter

Spanish

Sigma Theta Tau

Nursing

Tau Beta Pi, California Iota Chapter

Engineering

Career Placement Information

The campus may furnish, upon request, information about the employment of students who graduate from programs or courses of study preparing students for a particular career field. Any such data provided must be in a form that does not allow for the identification of any individual student. This information includes data concerning the average starting salary and the percentage of previously enrolled students who obtained employment. The information may include data collected from either graduates of the campus or graduates of all campuses in the California State University system.  Copies of the published information are available in the Cal State L.A. Office of University Admissions, Student Affairs 101.